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20131202
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mandela. flags across the country remain at half-staff and will stay that way until mr. mandela is buried. michelle kaczynski is outside his home. tell us what you are seeing there. >> singing and dancing until at least 3:00 in the morning. even on the second day. i think what immediately strikes you and touches you is the incredible diversity of this crowd. people still coming together with their entire families and their friends. they will come here with a feeling of togetherness of truly moving sense of community. one boy 7 years old, drew a picture of house and trees. he drove here from a tiny village four hours away. she said a school was built. she said because of mandela, her child and the other kids there have a good education. plus, a huge pad of flowers on the gates lead to go mandela's home. people having their own gatherings. they will come here where they feel closer to mandela where he lived as well as closer to each other. >> michelle, we're having a little bit of trouble hearing your audio. i have to tell you what i love is how this nation, their mourning is so joyful. the
's a street party that continues on now for several days since mr. mandela's death was announced on thursday evening here. the street has been filling with marchers, with choirs, with schoolchildren, with ordinary people who have come from far and near to be here, to be part of a celebration of mr. mandela's life. all of this is perhaps a day of anticipation because tomorrow about a mile or so from here, that huge soccer stadium that seats some 80,000 people, there will be countless people gathering to come to mourn, to come and breathe and celebrate mr. mandela's life. it may be the largest organization ever, perhaps rivaling the services for pope john paul ii when there were 70 heads of state, kings and queens. we are hearing there will bow 50 or 60 heads of state. leaders from as far away as new zealand and australia also coming here. although the american delegation, as you mentioned, which was scaled down based on the wishes of the south african government, they are trying to limit this. there is just a huge outpouring for mr. mandela and literally the world wants to be here. millions m
in johannesburg. byron? >> reporter: it's a bit loud here on the street outside of mr. mandela's home. people singing songs and chants from the movement mr. mandela lead here decades ago. all day long here, a steady stream of humanity, as people have shown up, sometimes entire families. here, we show their last respect to the man this entire nation so adored. as the world mourns the death of nelson mandela through song, dance and tears, details about his grand state funeral are coming out. >> we should all work together to organize the most befitting funeral. >> reporter: beginning tomorrow with a national day of prayer and reflection, for south africa. with an official service on tuesday in johannesburg, where thousands are expected to gather at the fnb stadium, the same stadium where mandela made his last public appearance during the 2010 world cup. the services are expected to be the largest in generations, with prominent leaders and dignitaries from across the globe attending, including president obama and the first lady, who travel to south africa next week, to pay respects, bringing alo
woman, very dignified woman, you know, mrs. mandela, win any mandela the girls, nani, zuni they have been beautiful through this whole process. i think there is a profound sense of sadness, because when you finally get the word that, you know, the chief is gone, you know, it is overwhelming but i think there is an equal amount of joy and festivity and people celebrating, okay, now this major event has happened, but i think the family is actually very dignified and holding up very well. >> rose: what do we know what is going to happen between now and the actual funeral day? >> yes, there is, you know, there is a number, a series of protocols that have been put in place by the south african government are executing, obviously on the tenth there will be a huge rally in soweto, you know, archbishop tutu will preside over the funeral, the funeral is on the 15th and i would anticipate it would be one of the largest gatherings of heads of state in, you know, in modern history. you may see more heads of state attend mandela's funeral that john f. kennedy's funeral so it is going to be very e
sanctions was the beginning of the he said. i met with mrs. thatchter day before mandela was set free and britain never broke from apartheid south africa. but the u.s. played the most significant role of any. i think, i was listening to brother doug speak. he chose a critical point. he had a chance for a very bloody south africa. but the unfinished business. and i think that reconciliation over retribution. we had a conversation about two years ago. we were talking. he said he had been the military leader. he felt nonviolence would not work there. he planned to blow up a hospital in desperation. he was captured just before that happened. he is glad he got caught. he would rather have spent 27 years in jail than to have the blood on his hands of innocent people. to me that is quintessentially him. he also made some tough decisions politically about his allies. he reached out to cuba. he reach out to libya. he tried to bring a nonaligned mission. ted global vision and very principled stands on those issues. >> and president obama only met nelson mandela once, i believe. there did seem t
was interviewed by ted koppel on night line and ted koppel leaned in and said, mr. mandela, the communist. they were the only ones that helped us. next question. >> you're talking about the controversial part, that he aligned himself with revolution areas like fidel castro, gaddafi and was briefly a member of the communist party. as you write about that in the book, he transcended that when he became president. he certainly didn't seem to follow -- and such. how did he do that? how did he transcend that? >> he believed so deeply in his cause. keep in mind what apartheid was like. here he had a small white minority that controlled the fast population and assets. south africa is a beautiful country with many, many assets. it was terrible what was going on there. i visited south africa more than once. i was there, my bride and i, and a small delegation from our administration. we were there in '91 as a guest. >> you met them there. you talk about the bitterness and lack of anger. he didn't go after his opponents. he started truth and reconciliation. >> isn't that something? truth and reconci
but not forgotten. ♪ free free nelson mandela >> mr. nelson mandela will be released. >> good evening. this is nelson mandela's first full day of freedom. >> reporter: released at the age of 72 in 1990. he remained ever vigilant that his country and its freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you, not as a prophet. but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release after nearly 30 years of imprisonment ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today, the majority of south africans, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1993, mandela, along with south africa's president, f.w. de klerk, won the nobel peace prize. and in 1994, mandela's dream was realized when black south africans cast their first ballots in a democratic election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> afri
peacefully last night surrounded by his family. mr. mandela, became a symbol of hope around. world for his life long struggle against the apartheid system of racial segregation in his country. he spent 27 years in prison for defying that system. after his release he sought not revenge but reconciliation. mr. mandela went on to push for one of the most progressive constitutions on planet and became south africa's first democrat exly elected black president. he chronicled end of apartheid and mandela's election and serving as african correspondent for the bbc. tom, thanks for joining us today with your thoughts. and what were they when you first got the news that mandela pass ad way? >> i had a lot of emotions both at a personal level and a professional one. i had the same feelings that everyone had, this was absolute titan of the global stage whose like we'll probably never see in our lifetimes again. these sort of men only only come around everyone hundred years or some i have memories when i met him during the time i was in south africa, particularly of his personal warmth and humor. i re
, this was not entirely unexpected news, given mr. mandela's health. how are south africans reacting? >> reporter: mara this was predictable news but painful none theless, announced late at night just before midnight south african time. many millions of south africans are still waking up to learn the news the father of this nation passed away during yesterday evening. first the mood here at nelson mandela's suburban home was fairly somber. now it is incredibly cell la braer to. people are bringing flowers, cheering, singing songs from the anti-apartheid struggle. they're celebrating his life and celebrating the lives they can now lead as a result of his anti-apartheid struggle. many people wondering here precisely what will happen next? what will the state event be. they're waiting for details about a lying in state which is expected in the next few days and about a burial which one american diplomat described as being the biggest state burial in the world since that of winston churhill. >> celebration of a remarkable life, rohit kachroo, thank you for that. >>> in so many ways nelson mandela is known
visit. equally as important, however, was to have the kind of public support for mr. mandela and the organization and the public content and to have that public support that would out weigh the notion that they were. >> he himself said he didn't want to be known as a saint sai. if we go too far in bea beatifyg him that the message will be lost. we always have to be concerned about that because there is a tendency when we deal with sound soundbites. it gives an image of a person. i think it's important to highlight his real attributes of leadership and his his personality and personal attributes as a personality of south africa. he never waivered on the notion that he was a symbol of oppressed people. >> right. and on that point. on the point of leadership, ambassador, a final question to you. you saw it. you were an an ambassador of gim zimbabwe. because of the way he governed south africa. you see a different south africa than what happened to zimbabwe there. mandela's leadership was tremendously important. >> enormously important. after 27 years in prison most of which was
when he came in 1990 it was a big part of the visit. it said welcome home mr and mrs nelson mandela. one of the people who remembered that was the historian, mr billy mitchell. we talked about what that day was like in his memory. >> he was fully aware that all the people from civil rights fighters and to have his preps here, it meant a lot to all of us coming up out of problems. we were going through housing, education, things that of nature. his presence made us feel good, that there is hope. if this man could spend it that much time in prison and never gave in, so, of course, that would be reflected in the community that he was visiting. we were so positive by him being here, that there's nothing we can't do. >> tonight we have seen a lot of people stopping buy to share stories along each other. a few gathering under the apollo marquee. people have brought pictures by. a lot of pictures sharing memories of that day. so many people came by to see him. >> thank you very much. we are doing to take a break, but we'll look at nelson mandela's fight against apartheid coming up. convers
. every day here in south africa, until mr. mandela is finally laid to rest. >> a man who changed the world. >>> our ron claiborne has covered nelson mandela extensively throughout the years. >> ron has had many experiences and memories. and is here with a personal take on the story. >> when you cover a story or a person, it requires professional detachment. we're supposed to stand back, observe and report. for nelson mandela, it was difficult for me personally, because something kept getting in the way. the fact that i admired the man deeply. the first time i saw nelson mandela was at yankee stadium in 1990. six months after he had been released from prison. i was in awe, probably we all were. but then he did something that charmed all of us. >> you now know who i am. i am a yankee. >> reporter: as a college student, i read about this man serving a life sentence for fighting against apartheid. i was fired up by the slogan, free mandela. years later, at abc, i traveled to south africa to embezzle his birthplace and qunu, where he you up as a small child. and where he will be burie
in a gathering with mr. mandela. i'll never forget, he said you cannot be afraid to grow and evolve. you have got to be willing to continue to grow, if you're going to be effective, and he grew. you've got to remember there were a lot of nationalist groups that said he had turned soft, sold out. there were a lot of different tensions there. he was able to withstand the hatred and opposition of the african, a whites and he was focused on democracy. >> he was incredibly tenacious in that he had the question of black nationalism versus the question of integration. eugene, you have a great piece and i'll read an exert of it today. we should remember not only the man who embraced his former enemies but also the man who refused to be bowed by those enemies, who remained militant despite 27 years of imprisonment who walked out of jail with his head held high and eyes toward the future. >> we think of nelson mandela and see that smile that's like sunshine. it just lights up anyplace. i only had the experience of meeting him once, it was in '94 and he was already nelson mandela. but before, long before, i
things as mr. mandela did for his people. that was my point. ron from pennsylvania. st. nicholas was a greek bishop serving in turkey. the statement was his association with christmas began in holland. juan gutierrez, el paso, texas. we saw the santa predicament by telling our daughter he works for jesus. michael from virginia. bill, i figured out a way to get my mail read. mention the bolder, fresher tour. bingo, mike. we'll see you in charleston friday, march 28. knoxville saturday, march 29. tickets sell fast. get them while we have them. they make great christmas gifts. 50 tickets left in san diego for the february 21 show. nick from wooim.reilly.com. i'm the freshman class president and enjoy your books. i have benefitted from your leadership. i appreciate that. merry christmas. happy holidays to everyone there. finally the factor tip of the day, saving you money again. you know, we don't like to endorse big companies. it's not what we are here to do. however, if you become a prime member on amazon.com, you get big discounts on everything they sell. it costs $79 a year but y
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
of them -- not just -- i mean, in one sense, dad, because he was killed early, became an iconic figure. mr. mandela, over time, after he came out of jail, became iconic and once he became the president of the country. >> and he was particularly meaningful in your family. i think in your mom's kitchen -- >> yeah. >> -- there are family pictures, or there had been family pictures and the one non-family member of a photograph in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us
that is emanating from there. i have to say that i read with a chuckle about the first time that you met mr. mandela back in 1990. i want you to tell people because you were literally star struck. >> i absolutely was. i've been blessed to be around some phenomenal people, some great leaders, but there's no one like nelson mandela. so yes, the first time i was in his company was immediately after we had organized a glorious ticker tape for him parade down broadway in manhattan. we took him into city hall in new york, and had found myself alone with him in the mayor's office. and i didn't realize that i had been just staring at the man for probably ten minutes till i heard a voice say, excuse me, young man. can i trouble you for that glass of water. i realized that he had probably asked me several times for some water after being out in the heat and this long parade. i raced, got him the water and darn near spilled it all over him, i was so incredibly nervous and in awe of him. even though when you were around him, you were in awe, there was something about him that will created an accessibility, too.
interviewer. he said, mr. mandela, about the communists, and madiba said, well, they were the only ones that helped had us, next question. >> interesting. >> and moved right ahead. >> you afforded him a ticker tape parade down the canyon of heroes, which was reserved for very few. that's like amelia earhart, john glen, jesse owens. that was extraordinary. did he understand the significance of that? did he get it? >> oh, yes. he was a very wise man, and he understood the significance. later when we had a gathering at yankees sta yankees stadium, it must have been 60,000, 70,000 people. i put the yankee jacket around his shoulders and the cap, and he looked out at the crowd and said, now you know who i am. i am a yankee. and that went around the world. george steinbrenner was so impressed he said, i'll pay for it. >> you know that was impressive he was going to put out for that. how about the reception in harlem? what was that like? >> it was amazing. he spoke at 125th and lenox avenue, the site from which people like malcolm x and martin luther king and many had spoken earlier. here's th
. >> the official mourning of nelson mandela has begun. president obama and mrs. obama will attend the furniture on tuesday. it's part of a series of events planned to honour the leader. >> i'm john henry smith, we'll look on a championship saturday in college football. the day that stood up for d.c. s. >> al jazeera continues in 2.5 minutes. i'm morgan radford. i'll be back with all the top stories. >> troops on the ground. hundreds of french troops sent to the central african republic trying to restore order. anti-government protesters in the ukraine call for a million-man march trying to get rid of the government. in a day of mourning nelson mandela's ex-wife attended a church service to pay tribe ute to a government. gold snap across the city - smart lander at a stand still. freezing rain and heavy snow - cold snap. >> good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, live in new york city. the french president issued a veiled warning to the president of the central african republic, francis hollande saying it will be tough to keep him in place given the violence or the ground
now stories we're watching this hour on "happening now." the president and mrs. obama on their wear to south africa to attend the memorial service for nelson mandela. they will be joined by three american presidents and first ladies and 100 heads of state a big story for us. >>> a new mexico state police officer that shot at a minivan full of children in october, plans to appeal his firing claiming wrongful termination. the video shows the officer shooting at minivan as it drives away. there is more to that story. >>> the shipwrecked costa concordia when the captain left his ship, he is on trial for manslaughter abandoning the ship and causing the 2012 shipwreck because of sailing too close to the island. jon: north korean leader kim jong-un sending a tough message that no one is beyond reach in his regime even his family. he ousted his uncle at a leadership role after the uncle was arrested at a party sunday. this is far from kim jong-un's first purge. jonathan hunt is live with more. jonathan? >> reporter: very interesting, jon. this is a clear sign that kim jong-un, the leader of
in johannesburg. mandela made his last public appearance at the 2010 world cup. it's confirmed, president obama and the first lady will be there, along with former president george w. bush and mrs. bush. former president jimmy carter and former president bill clinton and mrs. clinton are expected at the funeral next sunday. wednesday through friday, he will lie in state in the nation's legislative capital. next sunday, the state funeral in his hometown on the eastern cape. his long-time friend and lawyer, george bizos. >> he will go down in history, i think, as the revolutionary who didn't believe in violence. >> reporter: earlier today, we had our first public sighting of winnie mandela, his former wife and partner in the dark days of apartheid. tomorrow will be quiet. on tuesday, the gathering like the world has never seen before, as dignitaries from around the globe gather to say farewell to nelson mandela. bianna? >> a week of mourning, reflection, and celebration. our thanks to you. >>> nelson mandela has a large and complicated family tree with over a dozen grandchildren. some of them ope
will attend the memorial service. the bushes will travel to south africa with president and mrs. obama on air force one. also word that former president bill clinton will be there as well. he has been talking about nelson mandela's legacy. president clinton telling fox news's ed henry that mandela gave him advice during the monica lewinski scandal, interestingly enough. he says that mandela, who spent 27 years in prison, taught him not to hate his enemies. >> i said, didn't you hate those people when you went in? i seen the pictures of you as a young man. you were really mad. he said, i realized they could take everything from me, everything except my mind and my heart. those things i would have to give them, and he said i decided not to give them away. and he looked right at me and he said, "neither should you." the heat was really being turned up in congress, and mbeki looked at me and he said, madiba told me to give you a message. he said i have no earthly idea what it means, but you would know what it means. i said what did he tell you? he said i should remind you not to give them away. >
stunning, saying thicks like go home, ted, you're drunk. he, mandela, was communist terrorist and targeted people for no other reason than being white. stunned to see you support this scumb scumbag, mr. cruz. he was a communist, a huge supporter of abortion. putting him in the same language of stalin, fdr, who are also dead and don't deserve a eulogy either. what does that tell us about the generations reflecting on this? >> shocking comments. these are ted cruz's ostensible supporters. how incredibly disturbing must it be for americans to read that, to say this is -- this vein of political thought, however large or small it is, exists in our country. >> i hope it's disturbing to us. >> i hope so. >> i'm mostly disturbed that maybe it isn't disturbing to us. >> obviously americans who agree with it, they're out there. i can't imagine it's a very large population, but it saez lot about people have asked for a long time what's the racial perspective of tea party members. unfortunately this is the perspective of some of them. >> remember, where you started the conversation about dr. king, i w
'll be a state funeral. however, we have information because at that funeral nelson mandela's family and the world will say goodbye to the first nobel peace prize laureate and will be attended by world leaders, the president, mrs. obama, david cameron and his wife. the final details of the state funeral have not properly been worked out. it is reported to be sunday 15th, but it's not guaranteed. that will be the day hes buried in his ancestral home. it's 450 miles since johannesburg. that is the site of the - of three of his children and close family members. it's in a place like this that nelson mandela. madeba, will lie in peace forever. >> that was al jazeera's john terrett reporting. >> delegates from iran, the u.s. and five other world powers are preparing to iron out the details of a deal to monitor iran's nuclear program. talks are set for geneva, focussing on when the talks will be held. diplomats hope a short-term deal will lead to a final settlement, calming fears of a nooek lure bomb. >> as world powers prepare to sit with iran. the door is opened to selling defense system
want. natalie? >> absolutely. go get yourself a hot chocolate, dylan. thank you. >>> president and mrs. obama are traveling to south africa today to attend tuesday's public memorial service for nelson mandela. the anti-apartheid icon died thursday at the age of 95. former president george w. bush and his wife were invited to join the obamas aboard air force one. president obama's expected to speak at the service which is being held at a 90,000-seat sports stadium in johannesburg. >>> some of the nation's top reformers of all time were honored last night in washington. piano man billy joel, opera star martina arroyo, herbie hancock, shirley maclaine and carlos santana received kennedy center honors. the president was among those paying tribute. >>> prince harry's trek to the south pole with the teams of wounded service members including one from the u.s. is no longer a race. nbc's ayman mohyeldin tells us why it's been turned into an exercise of survival and cooperation. >> reporter: it began as a race to the south pole. wounded soldiers, hollywood actors and a prince. three teams all r
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)